Latest Blog

Maximizing Learning Across the Developmental Stages of Play for Young Children
Mar 08th, 2023

Play is an integral part of a child’s development, as it provides opportunities for children to learn, grow, and develop new skills. The way in which children play changes as they grow and develop, with each stage offering unique opportunities for learning and development. Understanding the different developmental stages of play and the types of play that are most beneficial at each stage can help parents and caregivers maximize the opportunities for learning and growth in their children.

Unoccupied Play (Birth- 3 months)

From birth to about three months, children are busy with unoccupied play. During this stage of play, children occupy themselves with watching anything that happens to be of passing interest. They also may make a lot of movement with their arms, legs, hands, and feet. During this level of play, children are learning about the world around them and discovering how their body moves. Children seem to be making random movements with no clear purpose, but this is the initial form of playing. To maximize learning during this stage of play, parents and caregivers can prompt children to interact with their bodies and provide them access to different sensory toys or items to interact with and explore.

Solitary Play (Birth-2 years)

The next stage of play is known as the solitary play stage, which typically emerges in children between birth and 2 years old. During this stage of play, children will play alone with toys, exploring and discovering the world around them. Solitary play is important for developing a child’s cognitive and physical skills, as well as building their sense of self-esteem and independence. To maximize learning in this stage, parents and caregivers should provide children with simple, age-appropriate toys that encourage exploration and discovery, such as blocks, stacking toys, and soft toys. Additionally, parents can model how to play with different sensory or cause-and-effect toys and reinforce engagement with these items.

Onlooker Play (2-3.5 years)

When children reach the ages of 2-3.5 years old, onlooker play tends to emerge. During this stage of play, children spend most of their time watching other children play. Children may talk to the children being observed, ask questions, or give suggestions, but they will not overtly enter into the play. When children are in this stage, it might seem like they’re missing out on physical play and interacting with other children. However, this stage is important for a child’s development as it boosts their social-emotional and cognitive skills. Children may not be actively playing, but they’re busy taking mental notes through observation. To maximize learning in this stage, parents can encourage children to play around other children, provide toys or items that other children are engaging with, encourage them to observe what other children are doing, and model commenting on the other children’s play activities.

Parallel Play (2-3 years) 

The next stage of play is known as the parallel play stage, which typically occurs between the ages of 2 and 3 years. During this stage, children play independently, but the activity chosen naturally brings the child among other children. The child plays with toys that are like those the children around are using but plays with the toys as they see fit and does not try to influence or modify the activity of the children near them. In other words, the child plays beside rather than with the other children. Parallel play is important for developing social skills, as children learn to share space and interact with others. To maximize learning in this stage, parents and caregivers should encourage children to play together, providing toys that encourage interaction, such as balls, riding toys, and play kitchens, prompt the child to engage in the activity if needed, and reinforce engagement in the activities and for playing around peers

Associative Play (3-4 years)

The next stage of play is known as the associative play stage, which typically occurs between the ages of 3 and 4 years. In associative play, the child plays side-by-side with peers and may borrow and loan toys, but there is very little interaction or organization. In a group setting, all the children may engage in similar activities, there is no common goal, division of labor, or organization of the activity around materials, goals, or products. There are also no rules within play and children may all be playing with the same items but not doing the same thing. It is in this stage of play, however, that children learn the skills of getting along with others, cooperation, and language skills. To maximize learning in this stage, parents and caregivers should provide opportunities for children to engage in activities with peers, set up peer play dates, provide the child and peers with activities they all prefer, and be ready to prompt and reinforce peer interactions if needed.

Cooperative Play (3-4 years)

Then, at around age 4, cooperative play emerges. In cooperative play, the child plays in a group that is organized for the purpose of making some material product, striving to attain some competitive goal, dramatizing situations of adult and group life, or playing formal games. During this stage, children will play together in a more organized and structured way. Examples of cooperative play include Board games, role-playing games, “Simon Says”, and “Follow The Leader”. Cooperative play is important for developing teamwork and leadership skills, as well as promoting social development. To maximize learning in this stage, parents and caregivers should encourage children to play together in groups, providing toys and activities that promote cooperation such as board games, puzzles, and sports equipment, prompt engagement if needed, and reinforce participation.

Sociodramatic Play (5+ years)

Cooperative play then evolves into sociodramatic play at around age 5. Sociodramatic play usually involves children developing roles, creating their own storylines, making up their own spoken lines, interacting with each other, and directing each other in play. Children use sociodramatic play to practice important language and social skills, including joining in, sharing and taking turns, interacting through different relationships (parent/child, brother/sister, doctor/patient), and negotiating with each other about how the play will go. To maximize learning in this stage, parents and caregivers can encourage children to play together with peers, provide toys and activities that promote role play and imagination such as dress-up clothes and play structures, prompt or model play sequences, and reinforce engagement.

In conclusion, understanding the different developmental stages of play and the types of play that are most beneficial at each stage is essential for maximizing the opportunities for learning and growth in young children. By providing appropriate toys and activities and encouraging interaction and cooperation, parents and caregivers can help their children develop important skills and build a foundation for future success.

Learn how we can help today

It can be overwhelming to know where to start. We help families like yours every day.
Get Started

Upcoming Events

Client Success Story - The Benefits of Early Intervention and Continued Support into Adolescence
Professionals
3.29.23 from 12 pm - 1 pm CST
Parents
3.30.23 from 7 pm - 8 pm CST

Free to Be Who You Are: Autism Treatment through a Neurodiversity Lens

Professionals
4.27.23 from 12 pm - 1 pm CST
Parents
4.26.23 from 6 pm - 7 pm CST

The Importance of Joint Attention in Early Intervention for Autism

Professionals
5.23.23 from 12 pm - 1 pm CST
Parents
5.23.23 from 7 pm - 8 pm CST

A Tale of Two Spectrums: Understanding Gender and Autism

Professionals
6.29.23 from 12 pm - 1 pm CST
Parents
6.29.23 from 6 pm - 7 pm CST
x